Formed over 3.000.000.000 years ago. Nuumite is found in an area slightly north of Nuuk, Greenland – accessible only by boat. The area where Nuumite occurs is in the so-called ‘Isuakasia’ iron ore region, the origin of which dates back almost four billion years. Nuumite has been used rather widely for untold centuries as beads and ornamental stones. The locality is high in the mountains and requires lugging heavy mining equipment up to retrieve the best specimens. These areas produce some of the oldest stones found on earth, and Nuumite falls in this category. Geologically speaking, nuumite is of volcanic origin and was formed about 3 billion years ago. Subsequent influences on the rock (metamorphism) have given rise to the striking mixture of crystals which gives Nuumite its unique appearance. Rocks resembling nuumite are also found in a few minor occurrences in the USA, but it is only in the Greenland type that colouration is developed well enough for the stone to be suitable for gemstones.

At first glance, Nuumite appears similar to labradorite but upon closer examination the beauty of nuumite and its schiller effect is astonishing. Labradorite usually shows broad splotches of “flash” while the smaller mixture of elongated crystals in nuumite (often in sheaf-like groups) create a striking gemstone. In the transition between the individual crystals (and especially the thin ones), an optical effect is created causing a special “inner” golden brown glow. This effect is also called iridescence, and is especially distinct on polished surfaces. The result is that the crystals appear as bright lamellae, almost like flames in a fire. The colours vary somewhat between reddish, greenish, and bluish hues, sometimes even within the same lamella. Between the bright lamellae, the colour is dark brown to black. Find more rare collector gemstones at www.freakingcat.com

Nuumite - Freakingcat, rare gemstone

Nuumite - Freakingcat, rare gemstone

 

 

 

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Skutterudite is a cobalt arsenide mineral that has variable amounts of nickel and iron substituting for cobalt with a general formula: (Co,Ni,Fe)As3. After polishing it takes on a beautiful metallic sheen!

Freakingcat rare collector gemstone, Skutterodite

Freakingcat rare collector gemstone, Skutterodite

 

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Trona (trisodium hydrogendicarbonate dihydrate); Na3H(CO3)2·2H2O is an evaporite mineral. (It dissolves in water!!). The word “trona” comes to English by way of either Swedish (trona) or Spanish (trona), with both possible sources having the same meaning as in English. Both of these derive from the Arabic trōn which in turn derives from the Arabic natron, and Hebrew נטרן (natruna), which comes from ancient Greek νιτρον (nitron), derived ultimately from ancient Egyptian ntry (or nitry). It’s very rare to get clear gems.

Trona, mineral, rare collector stone, Freakingcat

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On this blog Freakingcat will present regularly new rare gemstones which we manage to facet. We will give tips and tricks directly from our cutting tables to cutters and collectors.

We have right now an inventory of approximately 900 different gems, a total of over 10.000 gems and are eager to break soon through the 1000 gems barrier.

This is the biggest collection of Rare Gemstones in the world!

You can find most of our gems at FREAKINGCAT 

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